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and that cities are key to the economy. large cities produce 83% of economic output in the united states. the 30 largest cities in the u.s. account for half of all gdp. we're all in favor of good infrastructure until it comes time to pay for it. you say that some money can come from the private sector, we've had high-profile examples of public-private partnerships that have gone wrong. how do city governments make sure that city residents get what they pay for? >> i don't think there's any simple answer to this. one reason we might want a national infrastructure bank is not for the money, but to provide oversight, you have somebody to go to when you have a project, a regulator. an interlocutor. we should alloy private money. there's an additional problem. about so-called eminent domain. you can't just clear things out in china they used to at least just knock on your door and say you're moving. we're building a road here. you got to move out of your apartment tomorrow. we can't do that. it makes it trickier in our older cities to rebuild in the way they did in china. >> it's an interesting analo
more local or large city looks david roeder rights for the sun times, one of my favorites and put out a piece a couple days ago where he took three washington policy institutes and put together some of their research. he found if you just looked at large cities foreclosures were about 6% but the record is 6.1%. if you loosked at just chicago 8.7% foreclosure rate versus a year ago, year over year at 8.8. so only 0.1 better. if you specifically looked at cook county, their third quarter prices were down 3% year over year. you have the good, the bad, and it gets very difficult to just come up with one lump sum. one thing we can walk away with, it seems as though housing has bottomed. many states deal with the core process of foreclosures and there have been breakthroughs there. i've talked with many experts who really think there is still a shadow inventory of foreclosures that are going to be freed into 2013. you try to figure it out. the last, well maybe this is the credit market side of a possible positive for u.s. treasuries or some of the good ones like boon's. there's a "wall stre
will be doing great. the coastal cities, again, largely rain and travel delays will be impacted significantly where we have new york, philly and d.c. >> sounds like retailers can't catch a brick right now. superstorm system and now the storm is barreling its way across the country and with holiday pale at their weakest, heard that this morning, do retailers, can they make up for last yund. >> thank you. have, why don't you go first. what impact is it going to have? >> you have declining dispose al income and petter problems. you have the retailers that have inconspicuous stock and consumers are concerned about everything from hurricane sandy and the senseless slaughters in sandy hook, connecticut, spending less and giving more to charities. >> jan, i don't want to minimize any of this, the damage that this storm has already inflicted in parts of the country and could still inflict, but we were in an environment where people were just not shopping to begin with. do you think retailers could use this as a good excuse going forward? >> yeah, bert's here with me the four horsemen and apocalypse.
to be this political machine. but by and large it was run during these two guys in a connecticut yankee. it is the history of the city and the sub title, fearless as next and political wizard, underrated scoundrels. we still have a lot of those. but it's a different time now. i mean, it's no longer just albany. albany is about five or six townsel put together. it's story, schenectady, colony in saratoga. saratoga is only half an hour away. these are great places to live and to see. there's a lot to see you next time. it's also the beautiful town. it's a really beautiful town and a lot of people know it now. it doesn't have the reputation anymore i had. >> according to author mike lofgren, "the party is over." how the republicans are crazy, democrats became useless and the middle class that shafted. mr. lofgren, how did the republicans go crazy? >> well, they go crazy when they became an apocalyptic home that lives in its own bubble. we have seen not in the last election. they simply could not believe the public polls, what they were saying that obama was probably going to win and most d
on things. he loved being provocative. he largely created the new york city we now know, certainly the point of view. it inspired me because i have always looked up to people who sea change taking place and look at that as an opportunity instead of a threat. a couple of years before he died, i went to see him. he died about five years ago. he was at berkeley and at the time in his late 70's. he was running the graduates' magazine program at uc. he had serious cancer. it was very hard to understand him. he was still so excited about the student projects. he spent the entire morning taking me through these magazines his graduate students had created. he was an optimist and passionate about his work right to the end. it was also very instructive to recognize it is not work if you love what you do. >> let me follow-up on that. you have spoken about how you have never taken the easy path. you are drawn to where the heat is. that takes a tremendous amount of courage. why are you drawn to that? >> i do not know the answer completely except that i grew up as the oldest daughter and oldest granddaugh
things in america work. l'enfant, who designed washington's city, there was competition. he submitted the designs for a polis. americans were not having a palace. it was not particularly awe inspiring. in 1821, a european diplomat said it was neither large nor awe inspiring but the answer the congressman dave said the building served its purpose. if it were larger and more elegant, perhaps some president would be inclined to become its permanent resident. >> the key -- vicky goldberg has gathered a few of her paper white house totals. watch sunday evening at 7:30 eastern and pacific on american history tv. >> bankamerica ceo brian monahan said the government, lenders and borrowers have to reset their expectations on home ownership. he called for fannie mae, freddie mac and the federal health administration to return to the primary focus on helping low and moderate income homebuyers. he spoke at a brookings institution and bent on future of home ownership. this is just under an hour. >> good morning. i'm vice president and co- director of the economic study program at brookings, i'm pl
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6